Photo Dynamic Therapy or Blue-Light therapy


Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) is the combination of light and light sensitive agents (such as porphyrins) in an oxygen-rich environment. The  treatment uses a drug, called a photosensitizer or photosensitizing agent, and a particular type of light. When photosensitizers are exposed to a specific wavelength of light, they produce a form of oxygen that kills nearby cells.

 

 

Each photosensitizer is activated by light of a specific wavelength. This wavelength determines how far the light can travel into the body. Thus, doctors use specific photosensitizers and wavelengths of light to treat different areas of the body with PDT.







 

 

How does PDT work?
 

PDT works by direct injury to the target cells and tissues. This involves an activated oxygen molecule that can injure or destroy nearby cells. By preferentially attacking the active or abnormal cells, PDT combines a very high success rate with good preservation of normal skin without significant risks for scarring. Once the areas have healed following PDT, the areas are reexamined to see if additional treatments or biopsies are needed.


PDT essentially has three steps:

  1. Application of photosensitizer drug
  2. Incubation period
  3. Light activation


PDT is currently used in a number of medical fields including oncology (cancer), dermatology (skin), and cosmetic surgery. It is FDA approved for non-small cell lung cancer, esophageal cancer, and precancerous changes of Barrett's esophagus. Its use is also being further investigated through clinical trials in general oncology for conditions including cancers of the cervix (mouth of uterus), prostate gland, brain, and peritoneal cavity (the abdominal space that contains the stomach, liver, and internal organs). In dermatology, PDT with the photosensitizer Levulan Kerastick® (20% delta-aminolevulinic acid HCl) is used for the treatment of pre-skin cancers called actinic keratosis (AK). The initial approval was specifically for normal (non-hyperkeratotic) actinic keratosis of the face and scalp with a specified 14- to 18-hour drug incubation time, and 1,000 seconds (16 minutes and 40 seconds) of activation by a blue light source. PDT is also used for acne, rosacea, skin cancer, sun damage, cosmetic skin improvement, oily skin, enlarged sebaceous glands, wrinkles, rejuvenation (anti-aging), warts, hidradenitis suppurativa, psoriasis, and many other skin conditions. It is not used to remove moles or birthmarks.


Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is recommended for the treatment of wet age-related macular degeneration for individuals who have a confirmed diagnosis of classic with no occult subfoveal choroidal neovascularisation (CNV) (that is, whose lesions are composed of classic CNV with no evidence of an occult component) and best-corrected visual acuity 6/60 or better. PDT should be carried out only by retinal specialists with expertise in the use of this technology.

 

How is PDT used to treat cancer?

In the first step of PDT for cancer treatment, a photosensitizing agent is injected into the bloodstream. The agent is absorbed by cells all over the body but stays in cancer cells longer than it does in normal cells. Approximately 24 to 72 hours after injection, when most of the agent has left normal cells but remains in cancer cells, the tumor is exposed to light. The photosensitizer in the tumor absorbs the light and produces an active form of oxygen that destroys nearby cancer cells.

In addition to directly killing cancer cells, PDT appears to shrink or destroy tumors in two other ways. The photosensitizer can damage blood vessels in the tumor, thereby preventing the cancer from receiving necessary nutrients. In addition, PDT may activate the immune system to attack the tumor cells.

 

 


How is recovery?

 

Recovery is usually fairly easy and uneventful. Many patients have mild dryness and a faint to mild sunburn of the treated area. A small percent of patients may have moderate or marked discomfort and a harder recovery because of more skin dryness, redness, or burning.

 

Researchers continue to study ways to improve the effectiveness of PDT and expand it to other cancers. Clinical trials (research studies) are under way to evaluate the use of PDT for cancers of the brain, skin, prostate, cervix, and peritoneal cavity (the space in the abdomen that contains the intestines, stomach, and liver).



 

 

For more  information on photodynamic therapy, click here

 

 

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